Tag Archives: Small Business

Why Groupon Needs $950 Million More

Groupon logo.
Image via Wikipedia

The blogosphere is abuzz over tech-darling Groupon’s proposed $950 million Series G round. Many people have asked “Why do they need all that money?” And while expansion is the obvious answer, it’s a bit more nuanced than that. Groupon knows that in order to grow at scale in the SMB market you need a big sales organization with feet-on-the-street in the markets you’re hoping to reach. If you look at the successful small business advertising providers—the one’s that own large chunks of the market—they all have large sales forces. And it’s the large sales force that has stood between many a great, local-business-focused business plans and actual success.

Groupon knows that without people pounding the pavement, pounding on doors and pounding the phone, they won’t reach the mass of SMBs who are 1) not actively seeking out new advertising options online and 2) are hounded by traditional SMB advertising providers like the Yellow Pages, who don’t ever let up on closing small business deals. And to put that organization in place is going to take a ton of cash. You need sales agents in each city, you need sales management, you need office space, you need call centers, you need fulfillment, billing and operations teams to handle that size of a customer base. And that takes a ton of money.

What Groupon is doing is something that no other tech company has done in recent memory—made a real run at securing a big chunk of the SMB market. Sure, new local-business-focused companies pop-up all the time. But most of them are either niche providers or they partner with the big existing yellow page providers to get access to their sales organization. They become a B2B channel provider leveraging the existing sales force because few can generate or raise the cash necessary to build a sales organization to go out and reach those SMBs directly.

Even mighty Google has taken this approach until now. They’re either unwilling to, or culturally unable to, commit to the SMB market with a massive sales force. Google has targeted savvy SMBs directly with AdWords solicitations; but has also worked aggressively to partner with yellow page companies to sell AdWords as part of existing yellow page bundled services, and often resold as CPM-based impressions (e.g. spend $2,500/month to get a quarter-page ad in the yellow book, a bolded listing with a photo on the site and a bucket of impressions driven by CPMs). And they’ve supported that initiative with direct mail, SEM (of course) and some print advertising as air cover to increase awareness and trial of AdWords through one channel or another.

But it was not until just last week that Google started outbound telesales direct to small business owners. That is a direct response to Groupon spurning their offer, and the realization that if they’re going to get serious about local business they can’t solve it with an algorithm. They need to put people toward the business unit to succeed.

All of this of course sheds quite a bit of light on the Groupon/Google negotiations and why the deal fell apart. I think what Groupon’s board realized (and kudos to them for this insight) is that Google—at its core—is not a sales-driven company. They don’t have the internal buy-in to be a hardcore sales organization and they’ve never committed the resources needed to make small business a booming success. They’ve tried to do it every other way except invest in a massive sales force. And I think Groupon looked at what has worked in reaching SMBs at scale and they realized it’s not arms-length. They realized that SMB advertising is still old school. It’s still knocking and dialing for dollars.

Groupon realized that what they needed is a sales-focused organization, not a technology-focused one. And tying up with Google would be a mistake, because at their core the two companies are fundamentally different in what they know about going to market. Google knows that it’s tech and better and more tech; Groupon knows that it’s how many calls can we make in a day. Groupon’s board knew it wouldn’t thrive under Google.

Additionally, Groupon knew that tying up with a dinosaur of a yellow page business was a bad idea too. The margins are non-existent, advertising dollars are shrinking and moving online, and most observers are waiting for someone to drag those pre-Internet monoliths out behind the wood shed and put a bullet in them. So the only logical step for Groupon, between their options, is to go out and build the sales organization they need that supports the tech organization that they are.

So while everyone oohs and ahhs at $950 million and will continue to talk about bubbles in the tech space; I personally think Groupon has made a very savvy decision to truly be one-of-a-kind, to be the first tech company to go hard after the SMB market—and win.

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Google Gaga for Groupon’s Growth

The rumors started Sunday night with a note from Vator News that Google acquired Groupon for $2.5 billion. Now Kara Swisher over at BoomTown puts the number of the Groupon Google Deal at $5-6 billion. Whatever the number, the reasoning behind it is clear. Google is in a desperate hunt for revenue growth. Groupon is the fastest growing business on record. Google wants to finally crack the local nut after years of battling for SMB dollars with yellow page directories, Groupon is a sensation among small business owners. Those two factors make Groupon a must win for Google, and they’re willing to pay a premium for it.

Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

Google needs Groupon for growth. Google has no doubt been on a tear, but in 2009 they slowed, dramatically. Google advertising revenues grew 59% YOY in 2007, 29% in 2008, and just 8% in an admittedly tough economy in 2009. And in 2010, it looks as if advertising revenue will grow somewhere in the neighborhood of 15% if Q4 revenues are in the ballpark of the rest of the year. And while most companies would love to see this track record of growth, it can’t be satisfying to Google execs who have seen companies like Apple see their revenues and market caps up big. And even private companies like Facebook and Twitter are reporting big gains in users, big gains in advertising revenue (with Facebook’s purported $1 billion in revenue this year) and getting impressive private valuations.

It’s clear. The battle for web dollars is on. Google is turning more into a utility with good but not great growth while the aforementioned high fliers are getting the growth, the spotlight and the valuation. For Google, Groupon is the perfect antidote. An infusion of growth for a company that really has no other answers.

Think about it for a minute. Google’s big acquisitions YouTube and DoubleClick are not growth centers. Heck, YouTube is specutively a break even business unit at best. Their enterprise apps, mail, and other products are seeing user growth; but not revenue growth. And Google’s recent spate of product launches (refinements to search, HotPot, etc.) don’t point to any new revenue champs coming from internal teams. All this leads to Google looking for growth, and there is no better growth story on the Web right now than Groupon.

Groupon is enjoying 50% margins and an estimated $50 million per month in revenue. That’s a shot in the arm for Google’s bottom line. And Groupon isn’t even operating at scale yet. They’re still rolling up knock-offs, hiring sales and copywriting staff like crazy, and innovating on the product side to bring Groupon to everyone. And even if small businesses lament Groupon and even if Groupon’s not a great marketing strategy for business, it’s popular, it’s easy and it works to drive numbers to local businesses. And Google, for all it’s done on AdWords and Places has not been able to capture the imagination of small business like Groupon has.

For small business owners Google is hard and confusing. AdWords is competitive, expensive, requires keen oversight and intensive setup to get right. And even after doing all of that, the search query volume for “Pomona pet store” just isn’t high enough to drive real traffic and business to small business. And as anyone in the directory business can tell you, it’s not about branding, it’s not about being findable, it’s all (and I mean all) about making the register ring. Yellow page companies have been chasing this grail for years, with click to call technology and in-depth customer reporting, all in a desperate effort to tie results back to spend. And while Google has a much clearer ROI path and performance model, they can’t drive foot traffic, phone calls and new customers like Groupon can (and like the Yellow pages used to.)

But the yellow pages are expensive with high monthly minimums, and even with the advent of new performance plans on things like search and click to call, the industry doesn’t have a strong way to drive new business in waves (like Groupon) or have clear ROI reporting in line with Google’s.

Which gets us back to Groupon, because Groupon solves the two problems that Google and the yellow pages don’t solve. They get awareness, and lots of it. The Groupon rushes are famous by now. Google can’t generate demand like that, they can only help to harness existing demand and drive it in your direction. They can’t make more people search for teeth whitening; but Groupon can set off a wave of people who suddenly realize they need to brighten up their incisors. Groupon also has the low cost and the yellow pages can’t compete with that; their monthly minimums come and go every month for the entire year. Groupon, in contrast is pay for performance. You only pay for each person that buys, although, you pay out the nose.

When you put it all together, Groupon is a sexy, sexy target for Google. For all of Groupon’s misgivings, it’s a hot company; a big growth opportunity and a model that small businesses get and like, for the most part. So if Groupon is the right play for the company that wants to be the yellow pages of the Internet, the next question becomes the price tag. At $5 billion, this is no small potatoes, and represents Google’s biggest M&A deal ever. The questions are numerous – will Groupon be able to maintain margins in the face of stiff competition (currently at %50, the answer is NO,) will Groupon be able to scale efficiently, will Groupon be able to continue it’s growth? Not likely and not likely. There are only a handful of companies that have successfully cracked the local nut, their names are AT&T, SuperPages, Local Insight Media, Dex and a handful of others; all have large sales forces, and all have low margin, low growth businesses. Interestingly, most have had to reorganize via some form of bankruptcy or acquisition. Can Groupon buck that trend? Questionable. But they do have things going for them that yellow page companies don’t, like no cost of goods and production of books as massive cost centers.

So is $5-6 billion worth it to Google? Buying growth is expensive and companies will pay a premium for it. Just look at Disney’s acquisition of Marvel for $4 billion, all in the name of growth among tween and teenage boys. For Google and Groupon, time will tell; but I think the answer is yes, because Google needs growth, Google has the resources to scale Groupon and Google can leverage the wonderful world of advertiser bundles to sell things like places, tags, and AdWords to advertisers who make Groupon just part of their advertising/marketing mix. I argued that Groupon is not a marketing strategy; but Groupon, combined with thoughtful search, and other localized online marketing can be a part of a coherent small business marketing strategy. Google has all the pieces to deliver that value.

Let me know what you think.

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Groupon is Not a Marketing Strategy

Groupon logo.

Image via Wikipedia

Groupon‘s UK Managing Director Chris Muhr opined today that the reason Google would want to purchase Groupon was because Groupon has “…something that Google does not have and no one else has and that we have really tapped a new market,” but is it really a new market or have the just tapped into the greed and laziness of businesses who long for days of old media? I think it’s the later, which is why the idea of Groupon is at once appealing and dangerous to small businesses and brands all over. But first a bit of background.

How Groupon Works - Groupon highlights one business in each city every day with a sale that’s too good to pass up. (They also have “side deals” and Groupon Stores, but we’ll focus on the main deal here.) Usually 50% or more off retail price of a service or item. They like to focus on a price range that makes the item easily bought on impulse and guide businesses to try to stay under $50 for the best results. So if you sell wine for $30 a bottle they’ll want you to offer it for $12-$15 on Groupon. Then Groupon takes 50% of every transaction successfully processed through the offer. So to continue the example, if you sell wine for $30 regularly, you’ll put in on Groupon at $12 and you’ll end up with $6 per bottle sold. They’ll also set a tipping point for the deal to be activated (the “group”” in Groupon) and will also let you cap your deal at a certain amount of sales. It’s pretty easy to see that if you don’t have much margin built into your product, you’ll be in the red on every sale, depending on how you structure your Groupon. And if you can give up 75% of revenue and still make a profit, it’s likely going to be a very small one, which means you need to sell a lot of units to make any money.

So, then why does a business use Groupon? Businesses use Groupon because they can drive a large number of visitors to a store location with a single event. They hope that the new customers reached by Groupon will buy additional items above what is advertised (if you’re losing money on your Groupon this is considered a “loss leader” strategy,) and/or you hope that they become loyal customers that come back. But I also think they use Groupon because they’re lazy. That’s right. Lazy. And here’s why.

Groupon works a lot like a newspaper ad used to. You find the biggest circulation possible, you make an appealing offer and you hope that you get customers that will come in and like your business. It’s the old “spray and pray” model of marketing that worked so well in the days of mass production and mass consumption. Get it in front of them and they will buy. It takes little thought, little effort. It doesn’t take cultivating relationships, building a brand or finding customers who really need your service. It’s the laziest form of marketing out there.

If you’re a business you have four critical attributes that help drive sales: your brand, your prices, your awareness level and your location. There are of course many more; but let’s look at these four for a moment.

Your Brand – If you have a strong, growing brand, you don’t need Groupon. Your brand drives customers, customer loyalty, word of mouth marketing and strong margins. You can charge more, spend less on advertising and focus on growing your brand through unique experiences and high quality products. It’s a virtuous cycle, but one which few companies get into and fewer still that can maintain it.

Your Prices - If you don’t have a strong brand but you have incredibly low prices then you’ve defined yourself as the low cost leader, you’re first in the race to the bottom and you know you’ll live a life of low margins and need to move a lot of units to make up for it. You also aren’t ideal for Groupon because you probably have a brand associated with being the low cost leader, and Groupon’s pricing structure doesn’t work well in a low margin world (as outlined above.) If you’re priced in the middle of the market you really don’t have a lever for sales on prices because customers can go to the low cost leader.

Your Awareness Level – Among your customer base your awareness level is what drives repeat visits, word of mouth and new customer acquisition. If you have great awareness, if everyone knows that you’re the only 24 hour locksmith or the only tux rental place in town then you’ve got great awareness. If you’re one of 12 women’s clothing stores, like a Chico’s in a strip mall somewhere, you’re awareness level isn’t great. Groupon starts to sound like a good idea here.

Your Location - Unless you’re a virtual retailer with a strong ecommerce presence, you’re really limited to the surrounding area for your customers. How far they’re willing to travel to get to you is a function of all three above. Groupon makes sense here too.

So if you’re a middling business with little or no brand, little or no price differentiation, and a fixed customer base that is more or less only growing with the population in your area, then you have only a few levers to pull to make your business go. You can go about the hard work of building a brand in your community. Connecting with core customers, building word of mouth by creating an amazing experience, or demonstrating expertise above and beyond the competition. Or you can cut your prices, be the unbeatable low cost leader and price match anyone else. People know that they’ll get the lowest price from you and that goes a long way. Or you can increase your awareness by advertising, sponsoring events, etc. Or you can open more locations, a capital intensive process that may or may not work for your business.

Or, you can Groupon. Because with Groupon you don’t need to do any of that. You just spray and pray. Cut the prices on an item and let Groupon do the rest. But is that really it? Do the customers come back? Do the customers care that you exist? Do the customers remember who you are and where to go the next time they need something you provide? There are plenty of Groupon disaster examples on the Web that say “No.” Because without thoughtful marketing in place, Groupon is just a flash in the pan.

In the PR trade they say “Getting on TechCrunch is not a PR strategy.” I say “Getting on Groupon is not a marketing strategy.” And it’s where I think Chris Muhr is wrong. Google provides the savvy, thoughtful marketer a lot more than Groupon ever could. It provides the people willing to invest in their brand, their customer experience and their awareness with an avenue to showcase their business to people actually looking for them, not just people looking for a rock-bottom deal.

This goes for big brands as well as small businesses. If your brand is flagging, and you’re undifferentiated among your competitors Groupon is not going to solve your woes. It doesn’t matter how many gift cards you sell if you can’t convert those customers into repeat customers and advocates of your brand. And if you don’t fundamentally change your brand and the customer experience then Groupon will be nothing more than crack for your marketing department. Because each time you run a Groupon you’re high will be a little less than the last time and your hangover will be a little worse. For every Groupon you run, you dilute your brand a little bit. Do it once and it’s a marketing stunt. Do it over and over and you begin to redefine the value of your product or service. You hurt your brand and any differentiation you had. You’ve chosen the low cost leader, commodity approach. Prepare to accept the consequences.

So can Groupon work? Absolutely. Is it the right answer? Maybe once. Is it a strategy? Absolutely not. Is it easy? Too easy. Small businesses and big brands should focus on reengineering their customer experience from the web site to the warranty service. And when that is done then, maybe, it’ll be time to shout it to the world with Groupon. But more likely, the people that have been blown away by the change in your service will have already told the people you want to reach. Don’t be lazy. Do your job. Your brand and your bottom line will thank you.

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50% of YouTube Views Come in First 6 Days

Our friends at TubeMogul have an interesting graphic out today that shows that 50% of all YouTube video views occur within the first 6 days of publication.  That’s what happens when nearly 24 hours of new video are uploaded to the site every minute.  TubeMogul suggests that this means you should be uploading content on a regular basis – to always be resetting that cycle for your viewership.

But what about the other 50% of the traffic? And, which traffic is more valuable? The first 50% or the second 50%?  I think it depends.

If you’re a big brand like Toyota or the NBA then that early traffic is probably the most critical.  It’s your brand awareness, viral seeding moment where you get the widest reach and most momentum in any spreadability that’s going to occur around the content.  At SXSW a YouTube representative said that half of viral traffic for a video in the first 48 hours occurs as a result of the video being embeded.

But, if you’re a small business it might be that the last 50% – the long tail – of your video traffic is more important.  That’s because the second half represents people that had to work to find you. They were looking for you specifically or for information about a problem you’re solving.  And while the views are slow and steady it may be that they are the most engaged and higher converting views when compared to the “head” traffic.

Consider Google Adwords.  If you buy the top position in AdWords you certainly get the lion’s share of traffic. But that traffic is often less targeted and lower converting than positions 2-6.  Why? Because with more traffic comes more unqualified people.  But the people who actually read through the ads and find exactly what they’re looking for, while fewer in number, tend to convert at a much higher rate.

I believe that’s an appropriate paradigm to consider when looking at the “back half” of video views on YouTube – particularly for small businesses using video as a lead or customer acquisition tool.

What do you think?

via CHART OF THE DAY: The Half-Life Of A YouTube Video Is 6 Days.

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Small business video marketing – using a call to action

video call to action

I recently had the opportunity to write a guest column about online video marketing over at ReelSEO, and I focused on the importance of including a call to action in your video to encourage viewers to take action after watching.   Whether it’s subscribing to your YouTube channel, sharing the video with a friend, visiting a website or your store; a call to action is critical to creating measurable ROI for your video marketing program.

Here’s an excerpt of HOW TO: Create a Call to Action in Small Business Video, read the rest over at ReelSEO:

A video without a strong CTA is a missed opportunity for a small business looking to create new business from their video marketing. This is an important difference between video marketing for big brands and video marketing for small businesses. A large brand can post a video and use “softer” measures of success such as reach, brand recall, and impressions, but small businesses have limited budgets and success is measured in terms of ringing the cash register.

Image via ReelSEO.

Disclosure: I work for TurnHere. We make and promote video for small businesses.

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How Many Trade-Offs Can You Afford?

Trade offs. We’re asked to evaluate and make trade offs everyday. Particularly when it comes to things that are hard. Building a web site. Creating advertising. Starting a new public relations campaign. Delighting the customer. All hard tasks, all made harder by the constant need to make trade offs. How willing are you to trade quality for cost, or time for cost, or user experience for profit? These questions are posed every day and answered differently by people depending on the situation and the costs of the trade off.

The million dollar question is how many times can you trade things that benefit you over things that benefit the customer before you lose? If you automatically opt someone in to email marketing upon registration you’ve traded a faster list build for the trust of the customer. If you build in aggressive upsell offers in your sales funnel you’ve traded a larger order size over customer goodwill and usability. If you use an auto-attendant on your phones you’re trading cost for customer aggravation. In each one you’re making a bet that the cost savings outweigh the damage you do to your customer relationship.

Trade offs are like playing chicken with your customers. Who will blink first in a race down to the mimimally acceptable transaction?

What a sad and dangerous way to engage with customers. Playing chicken, seeing how much they’ll tolerate before walking away for good is never the way to building a successful, long-term relationship. It’s why you don’t see great companies doing it. You may see profitable companies doing it. But you don’t see companies and brands that people love doing it. Why?  Because people don’t want to invest money and time in to an adversarial relationship; they want a beneficial relationship. One that helps them. No one wants to look over their shoulder constantly to make sure they’re not going to get jumped.

Bigger companies, quasi-monopolies and government can get away with it-simply because we have no alternative. A cable provider can treat you like crap, so can a telco, because switching costs are high and choices are limited. In those environments the trade offs are easy to make.  Trade 200 customer service reps’ salaries by keeping people on hold 5 minutes longer? Easy. Cap Internet bandwidth and add another pricing tier to penalize your most active customers? Easy.

But small companies don’t have the luxury of making those trade offs. Why? Because people can and will go elsewhere. It’s hard to vote with your wallet when you only have one cable provider in your area. It’s a lot easier to vote with your wallet by choosing one of a dozen companies providing the service you need on the Web.

Additionally, small companies don’t have the advertising budget to gain the traction they need with the mass audience. They need strong word of mouth to grow their business. They can’t treat their customers poorly or ding their pool of goodwill repeatedly during the sale process because only bad things can happen:

  • They’ll get one sale but the customer will never return, looking for a better service in the future
  • The customer will abandon the sale process and try someone else
  • The customer will buy but not tell anyone
  • The customer will buy but tell anyone who will listen not to buy
  • The customer will not buy and tell anyone who will listen not to even bother

All of those outcomes can spell death to a small company trying to build a reputation.  The world is too small and too connected today for small companies to make repeated trade offs at the customer’s expense.

In reality trade offs must be made.  There are development limitations and cash limitations that make it impossible to meet every expectation right off the bat.  But this simply makes the trade offs that you do have control of even more important.  Because people will put up with and understand that as a new company you need to make trade offs in some areas.  In others, people aren’t as forgiving.

So if you rely on word of mouth, if you rely on reputation to grow your business, think long and hard the next time you look to trade something for the time, respect, effort or goodwill of the customer.  Because the next trade you make could be the one that causes your customer (and their friends) to walk for good.

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Starting from Scratch

I’ve been talking to my mom a lot lately about social media. As an owner of a two-person marketing and communications firm in Connecticut she needs to be up on this stuff and involved in it for a couple of very important reasons:

  • She could have more clients who would be willing to pay her to help them hire for marketing positions that require social media knowledge (are there any positions that don’t these days?)
  • As a competitor in a very defined niche – Connecticut and Western Massachusetts marketing and communications placement she has the opportunity to earn key search terms with the SEO benefits of social media
  • Her 25 years of experience is tons of great fodder for conversations and blog posts
  • There is a huge need for expertise in the most demanding job market in recent memory (maybe ever)

With that in mind I’m trying to help my mom get up to speed on social media and how it can work for her two-person business. So I thought I’d chronicle that experience here so you can follow the genesis of a small business social media campaign with all its fits and starts, side steps, lapses and hopefully, in the long run some successes.

Building a Social Media Strategy – Part 1 – Objectives

The first thing we needed to do was define why we were going to do this and what we were going to get out of it.  A plan.  I started by explaining to my mom the who, what, where, when, how, and why of social media.  We talked about her goals and laid out a social media plan to meet those goals.  We then identified some specific strategies and tactics to execute on to start the haul towards those goals.

Here are some of the objectives we outlined:

  • To create awareness of her company and visibility on and offline by demonstrating expertise in marketing/communications placement services.
  • To position her company as a personnel firm that “gets” how new/emerging technologies fit within traditional marketing/communication roles and has the know-how to find the right people to meet these needs.
  • To communicate with companies and hiring personnel who are looking for new talent via social media that her company has the people they are looking for.
  • To connect with Connecticut/Massachusetts-based job seekers utilizing social media tools to find jobs that her company can help them find the job they’ll love
  • To leverage social media as a cost-effective distribution platform for recruiting for open positions.
  • To leverage social media as a cost-effective way to engage and build relationships with potential new clients.

A couple of thoughts on these objectives (I wrote them a while ago, so it’s refreshing to look at them again):

  • Our goal is to demonstrate expertise. Bottom line.  My mom has so much experience that putting that information on display is the key to the whole exercise in my opinion.  I think there are a lot of companies like this – with decades of experience and few people know it.  I want to unbottle that and get it out to the world.
  • We’ve got a couple of end states.  Greater awareness is one – but it’s a way point to client acquisition.  The end goal is to get more business and more clients for my mom.  We’re going to do this by creating awareness, demonstrating expertise and building new relationships with social media.
  • We need to be very targeted with these efforts because of the limited reach of my mom’s territory.  Connecticut and Western Mass. are tight geo restrictions and so it is going to be important to find ways to dominate local search terms and build strong relationships with local people (influencers, potential clients, associations, etc.)

Once we’ve agreed on objectives it’s on to strategies; but it’s not rocket-science at this point.  Once we’ve defined success (which way is up) then we can start to layout how we’re going to get there.  At that point our tactics will fall in line with those.  After that, it’s about executing, measuring and refining to stay on target.

In the next post I’ll talk about strategies and also setting benchmarks that will allow us to measure success and failure of the program.  We’ll also talk about baseline tactics to begin this process.

So what do you think about the objectives? What are we missing? What do we have wrong? What would you recommend?

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If you’re a small business about to make the social media leap…

Here are a handful of things that I’d do right away.

Give yourself some time to do it well.  Everything is fairly easy, except for the blog.  Writing blog content takes time, is not easy at first, and of course has some of the best potential of any of the items above.

Once you’ve done that you should make it a regular habit to do the following:

  • Watch Google Alerts that mention your business and also check your Yelp! page.  If someone is talking about you, feel free to respond in an honest, open, friendly manner.  Build relationships.
  • Tell your friends and family about your new social media presence.  Ask them to follow and Fan you.
  • Find people that are interesting to you on Twitter through directories like WeFollow and by conducting searches about your local area or areas of interest using search.twitter.com. Follow them.
  • Start talking to them. Not pitching, not selling, but talking.
  • Feel free to provide special offers to your Facebook, Twitter or Yelp fans. Check out Luna Park’s Twitter feed for an idea on that.

There’s lots more to do; but remember, you can start small. You can make mistakes as long as they are with good intentions and you work to correct them quickly and earnestly.  Get out there and try a few things. See what works for you. Stick with it.

I’ll have more on this in future posts – stay tuned!

Photo credit

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